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Sprayed Polyurethane Foam (SPF)



Asphalt Shingles    Built-Up (Tar & Gravel)    Copper    EPDM (Rubber)    Metal Roofs
Modified Bitumen    PIB    PVC    Slate    Spray Foam    Tile (Clay and Concrete)
TPO (Single-Ply)    Wood Roofing

DENSITY & R-VALUE
Density of SPF is important when it comes to strength and Thermal Resistance. Obviously, higher density means increased strength and higher R-value. Most SPF roofs have densities ranging from about 2.5 pounds per cubic foot to 3 pounds per cubic foot. Three pound density foam has a compressive strength of about 50 psi and an R-value of 7.14 installed and 6.86 aged (these numbers may vary slightly depending on the foam manufacturer). Here's an example of how well a good SPF roof insulates. A school district in southern California had recently installed some new, one-room relocatable classroom buildings. During the late spring and early fall, these classrooms were using their air conditioners an average of 50 minutes every hour. The school district installed foam roofs on some of these classrooms in order to see if it would provide an energy savings. The roofs consisted of three pound density foam, 1.5 inches thick with an acrylic coating system. The air conditioner usage was cut down to fifteen minutes every hour. That's a fifty-eight percent savings on energy costs.

Does this mean an SPF roof pay for itself? Absolutely! Texas A&M studies indicate that an SPF roof in Texas and other southern climates can pay for itself in approximately four and a half years.

 

  
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